(click images above for more information)

 

 

SQUADRON EDUCATION OFFICER:   Lt/C Hal Willard, SN

Questions about Registation or see a course that interests you???... Contact:

 

SQUADRON EDUCATION OFFICER

Lt/C Daniel Cordell, AP

stang89@gmail.com

 

 

**Click here to Locate the Nearest USPS Courses or Seminars by Zip code **

 

 

 

Seamanship: < click for details

The Seamanship course is the next step after completing America’s Boating Course, 3rd Edition (ABC3), taking the knowledge and skills learned there and expanding and extending them with this newly updated edition. Or make Seamanship the first step into building boating confidence and competence for safe and fun on-the-water adventures. Seamanship presents material applicable to both power and sail, covering such topics as the construction and functioning of a boat, the skipper’s responsibilities, preparing the boat for use, handling and maneuvering a vessel under various conditions in close quarters and on the open water, rules of the road, anchoring, emergencies, and marlinspike/basic knots. The Appendices cover boating into the waters of Canada and Mexico, the effects of weather on the boater’s health, and general information on obtaining a US Coast Guard captain’s license.

 

Piloting:   <click for details

Piloting is the first course in the sequence of USPS courses on navigation, covering the basics of coastal and inland navigation. This course focuses on navigation as it is done on recreational boats today and embraces GPS as a primary navigation tool while covering enough of traditional techniques so the student will be able to find his/her way even if their GPS fails. The course includes many in-class exercises, developing the student’s skills through hands-on practice and learning. Ten classes of two hours each normally are scheduled for presentation of this course. In addition the students have seven days to complete the open book exam. Topics covered include:

· Charts and their interpretation

· Navigation aids and how they point to safe water

· Plotting courses and determining direction and distance

· The mariner’s compass and converting between True and Magnetic

· Use of GPS – typical GPS displays and information they provide, setting up waypoints and routes, staying on a GPS route.

· Pre-planning safe courses and entering them into the GPS

· Monitoring progress and determining position by both GPS and traditional techniques such as bearings and dead reckoning

The “Seaman’s Eye” – simple skills for checking that one is on course.

 

Advanced Piloting:   < click for details

Advanced Piloting is the second in the sequence of USPS courses on navigation. It continues to build coastal and inland navigation skill, allowing the student to take on more challenging conditions – unfamiliar waters, limited visibility, and extended cruises. GPS is embraced as a primary navigation tool while adding radar, chartplotters, and other electronic navigation tools. As with Piloting, the course includes many in-class exercises, advancing the student’s skills through hands-on practice and learning. Ten classes of two hours each normally are scheduled for presentation of this course. In addition the students have seven days to complete the open book exam. Topics covered include:

· Review of skills learned in Piloting

· Advanced positioning techniques such as advancing a line of position

· Other electronics:  radar, depth sounders, autopilots, chartplotters, laptop computer software, etc.

· Hazard avoidance techniques using electronics (e.g., “keep out” zones in GPS)

· Collision avoidance using radar and GPS

· Working with tides: clearances, depth, effects of current

· Piloting with wind and currents

 

Instructor Development:   <click for details

Unlike other USPS courses, the Instructor Development course is not designed to enhance boating skills. Rather, its emphasis is on enhancing presentation techniques and instructor skills. The course has been designed to demonstrate interactive teaching methods focused on adult learning. Students are required to prepare lesson plans and give three presentations to their peers utilizing a variety of teaching aids and presentation skills. The instructor may assign a topic for these presentations or you may use material and PowerPoint slides from existing USPS courses, and they may build on one another.

 

 

Marine Electronics (ME103) Navigation Systems: <click for details

Marine Navigation Systems is the third course in the Marine Electronics series. This course is currently in manuscript. It presently consists of eight chapters on electronic navigation instruments including depth sounders, radar, and GPS, and on display systems including chart plotters and personal computers. EMSCom will be adding sections on interfacing these systems (bridge integration) and a section on new visual aids to piloting.

 

Navigation:   <click for details

After Junior Navigation , this course is the second part of the study of offshore navigation, further developing the student's understanding of celestial navigation theory. This Navigation 2009 course deals with learning celestial positioning using other bodies, in addition to positioning using the sun (covered in the Junior Navigation course). This course also deals with electronic software tools that can be used to plan and execute an offshore voyage. You will first learn to reduce these sights by the Law of Cosines method. Later in the course, you will learn an additional method of sight reduction, the Nautical Almanac Sight Reduction (NASR) method. You will also learn about sight planning techniques. With that knowledge, you will have the tools to take sights and complete your Navigation Sight Folder. The course includes a chapter on using a software-based voyage planning tool and a navigation program. The final chapter of the course contains a Practice Cruise that ties the separate elements of the course together.

 

Engine Maintenance:   <click for details

The new Engine Maintenance course 2011 has been put into one ten chapter course that stresses the diagnosis of modern systems, while also teaching the basics of engine layout and operation. Gasoline inboards, outboards, and diesel engines are taught in a way that reinforces the common aspects of how engines work. This new course is complete in one book with one exam.

Modern engines offer high reliability and good performance through the use of computerized systems for fuel delivery and engine timing. Most of these systems are “black boxes” that can no longer be serviced by weekend mechanics with ordinary tools. The EM course covers those repairs that do-it-yourselfers can still perform, teaches how to diagnose problems that might be beyond your ability to fix, and how to share information with your mechanic so the right repairs get performed. The new Engine Maintenance course also covers basic mechanical systems such as drive systems (propellers), steering systems, and engine controls. The last chapter discusses solutions you might use to problems that could occur while afloat and away from a repair facility. Gasoline, diesel, and outboard engines are treated independently in this chapter.

 

 

 

 



SQUADRON TRAINING PLAN